Productivity culture, cognitive triage and the pseudo-commensurability of the to-do list

Advertisements

Take Heart

junk

by Mari Casey

V__AC15

The most difficult part of my recovery today, the most terrifying prospect in my life is not related to an urge to use or a potential relapse. It’s about dating. I’m twenty-six and single—a fun idea, right?—except I have four years clean, and just the thought of going on a date turns me catatonic. They recommend a year without sex when you first get clean. I didn’t do it then, but I might get it now, and not for lack of desire.

In my life, there are two major categories of potential suitors: people “in the rooms”— recovering addicts at the meetings—or “normies”—those strange creatures who can drink just one beer, maybe even hit one joint every now and again, normal people. I’ve dated in the rooms before. Pros: mutual understanding, shared experience, easy to meet. Cons: dating someone as sick as you are, and the whole…

View original post 1,644 more words

Black History-Ethel Payne

imageSherra Thompson BSW, MHPP, CPC, ICPS, Life Coach

Looking Back in Black History Ethel Payne­Trailblazer for Black Women in Media As we celebrate Black History Month, I sit and think about all the ones before us that have paved the way for Blacks to be successful in America. We at times take advantage of the hard work that was done, and take for granite the sacrifice that was made for us. Something as simple as what I am presenting to you now, on this platform we call Media, someone made a way for me to communicate through this outlet. Ethel Payne, known to America as the First Lady of Black Press, is the inspiration for Black women across America that aspire to have careers in Media. Ethel Payne, Born August 14, 1911, was a Columnist, Lecturer, Freelance Writer, Civil Rights Leader, and Educator. She used journalism as a podium to advocate for Civil Rights. Her passion for Journalism gave way for so many accomplishments. Ms. Payne was the 1st female African American Commentator employed by CBS in 1972, She covered the Montgomery Bus Boycott & Desegregation at University of Alabama in 1956, and the March on Washington in 1963. America is not where Ms. Payne limited her gift. She also covered American Domestic Politics & International Stories; she was the only Black Correspondent in 1956 at Bandung Conference in Indonesia. Her most memorable articles were a series written for The Defender titled T​he South At The Crossroads;​chronicling the South during the Civil rights period. In 1966 she provided on site coverage of African American Troops in Vietnam. Ms. Payne died May 28, 1991 at the age of 79, but her legacy lives on in Black Women across America doing Vlogs dedicated to politics and change, Blogs on changing black on black crime in America, News Commentators to Editors of Magazines. She has most definitely paved the way for us to take a stand to make change and speak about it in the form of Media. It is an honor to pay homage and Celebrate her legacy this Black History Month 2015.

References: http://www.aaregistry.org

American National Biography Online w​ww.anb.org/articles/16/16­03900.html

Go Down the Rabbit Hole: A Writer’s Manifesto

Writing for Digital Media

1. You are the work. The work is you: both an articulation of the self and a possibility for self-reflection. Be honest in creation: allow yourself to bleed into the work, but also allow it to work on you. Your work can show you things: illuminate and clarify your own thoughts, motivations, actions. If you do it right, you will find the work changing you, too.

2. Thinking is process. Laying on the floor. Sitting on park benches. Getting lost on purpose. These are all working. Learn the difference between mindless distraction and mindful wandering.

3. Go down the rabbit hole. Sometimes the work isn’t about what you think it is. Allow yourself to get lost down alleyways, to follow a train of thought around a corner. Don’t feel you need to reign yourself in. Too much focus squeezes all the possibility for revelation out of the work.

4. Fear…

View original post 290 more words

Rethinking Stealing with Jamaal May

The Minnesota Review

Jamaal May Jamaal May

I spent a good chunk of February 5th with Jamaal May. In hindsight, I should have chugged a gallon of espresso in order to keep up with this fast-talking, passionate, Detroit-based poet. Over lunch with a few Virginia Tech MFA students, May gave away morsels from the craft talk he would be delivering soon afterwards, titled “Steal This Class.” Having experienced teaching poetry in Detroit public schools, May deplores how something as idealistic as the U.S. education system has been boiled down to the place where we are merely programmed.

He elaborated on this during the craft talk at Shanks Hall, where he demonstrated how intelligence is nowadays assessed by how well we are programmed.

“What’s 1 plus 1?” May asked the audience. The chorused reply: “Two.”

“Let’s complicate the question,” May proposed. “One of what?” He went on to explain how this outside-the-box thinking in…

View original post 404 more words

Honesty or the Intelligence to avoid it??????

image

This is a really good friend of mine from Twitter…I promised that when my blog was officially up and running I would post this question…I wanna hear from you great minds out there because this is a deep question. Seriously when u think about it a person you trust can make you believe in every word they say but the truth is they could also just be so intelligent that they avoid being honest and their lie works. Tell me what you think????